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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 4
CSPAN2 1
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
, prejudice or what, but a major battle at moore's creek, north carolina, not far from wilmington, north carolina. a british fleet was going to land soldiers at wilmington, and an army formed inland, marching towards the coast to join up with the british regulars. a force that were rebels, but what we call patriots, intercepted them and massacred them at moore's creek, which is -- a blind gull issue where rebels were wait r for them to wipe them out. without the loyalists support, the british troops couldn't land keeping the south free of british control for a few years until they landed at charleston. yes, sir? >> you mentioned that the boston tea party spread south to new york and to other cities. almost sounds as though were the network of people who were having the same thought or inspired one way or the another or working together. i never thought of the boston tea party as being that, but is that really -- >> yes. sam adams set up because there was no other form of communication, set up a series of committees of correspondence in every major city in the country. they started commun
, texas. mayor moore passed away last week after 63 years as richmond's mayor. he was a true texan, a straight shooter who loved his family, good conversation, quayle hunting, ranching -- quail hunting, ranching and texas longhorn football. the last time i talked with mayor moore was richmond's 175th anniversary. my speech was interrupted by trains roaring by. the trains did not dare to interrupt mayor moore. i asked him, how can i do that? he said, give it time. give it time. he gave richmond time. the time of his life. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> to ask unanimous consent address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman from california is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i rise today to announce the discovery of a new break through in mathematics of the theory of vector bundles. part of the interest comes from its application to quantum mechanics, the theory that makes modern electronics possible, and p
: michael moore. host: i'm sorry? caller: michael moore. capitalism is dead. host: george, good morning. caller: good morning. george will. he is not an office holder and has no intention of running for public office. he gave a lecture in st. louis on december 4 and it was aired on c-span last evening. it was about progressivism and how would differs from thomas jefferson's vision and view of the basis for our government founded in natural rights. wilson was the opposite in his view. a little bit of a man involved subject. the movement started with president wilson and basically 100 years ago. george will analyze it in his lecture at the differences between the declaration of independence upon which thomas jefferson based the fundamental rights, the natural rights as announced in the declaration of independence. host: what is it about mr. will that makes him a hero to you? caller: he has consistently for decades espoused in billion form. fo brilliant writing he is a conservative in the truest sense of the word. he made clear the distinction between what happened in the french revolution
sustain the one-two punch is anybody's question. patti ann: joining us now is steve moore from the "wall street journal." hopefully he can give us some answers. good morning, steve. what is the most immediate impact in we go over the cliff? >> we are talking about january 2nd taxing rising on over a hundred million americans. this is a big sock to the wallet of americans of every income group. let's just talk about the middle class for a minute. for those earning about 45 to 75,000 a year they are looking at paying somewhere in the neighborhood of $2,500 a year more in taxes. it's not just the warn buffets and bill gates that will be hit by tax increases. the other part of the cliff that we don't talk that much about is the automatic spending cuts would take effect starting on january 2nd, an 8% reduction in major spending categories, national defense, many of what we call the domestic discretionary programs would also be hit. this is a big fiscal wallop to the economy and a lot of economists believe it could cause a double-dip recession. patti ann: on the other hand we are hearing from
solve our economic woes? let's ask mr. steven moore, writer for the with a wall street journal. i heard that quote and howard dean, dr. dean is one of the most liberal on the planet and saying, and i thought about that a little bit. does he mean everyone's taxes have to go up, including people who don't pay taxes now? >> a great question, because as you know, eric, about 40% of americans who file tax returns now don't pay any income tax, but i also saw that clip live when he said it and kind of mouth open, i was kind of shocked, but he's at least being an honest liberal here. one of the things about this fiscal cliff debate that bothers me, even if we raise taxes on the top two or three% and the president may reveil. then you go into 2013 and i heard the discussion on the debt which was fantastic. even if we do the tax increases on the rich they're not going to raise that much money and not that many people that make over 400 $500,000 a year and that means if the liberals want a fund these new programs and they want to bring this trillion dollar debt down. you know where they have to go
charisma. >> some call her the demi moore of her times. "the new york times," though, described her as an encourageable revolutionist to the end. >> she was indeed. they never gave up their dreams. >> "sasha and emma." >> what does "the new york times" say about this book? >> enormously rich book. a great review. great to have you on. >> thank you for coming on. >> thank you for having me on my favorite show. >> it's about time. >> seriously. >> your favorite show because you get a break from halperin. >> and i enjoy the show. >> she watched the show before i was on it. >> i did. i tried to get him to watch. >> so you were responsible for mark? >> i would say for months, you though, here, here is where it is. >> look at this. >> do you want to see huckabee? >> the better half. >> i said i prefer an aging deejay. >> fantastic. congratulations on so many levels. you must be so pleased. >>> still to come, former british prime minister tony blair joins to us discuss the volatile developments in the midd middle east and thoughts on how the fiscal cliff will impact europe and vice versa.
? >> brian: who is that next guest? i believe it's ryan moore, the ceo and founder of rebo innovation. >> yeah. >> gretchen: he's here to show you how you can work out from the comfort of your own desk. how did you come up with the idea? >> close friend of ours passed away from cancer. we were inspired to join 100-mile, three mountain bicycle challenge. but we needed to train. we were having a hard time running our business, getting our work done while cycling indoors and training. so we looked for a device that would allow to us mount or computers, but nothing existed, so we made our own. after training for the event exclusively using what we made and riding it, we thought hey, this is a great idea. it really works. >> steve: it really does work. and brian was talking earlier about how when he works out at the gym, he's always reading. but what i've noticed is, and this is great because you've got a laptop here -- is it's often shaky. so it's hard to read. if you come up with this desk thing, foamy and i'm sure nasa helped you develop it, the computer stays absolutely rock steady whi
on what we know today. >> steven moore before we open it up to question. glenn mentioned corporate tax reform earlier. warren buffett says that tax rates don't matter of as much as a lot of people pretend, when it comes to companies that and investments and innovation. i suspect you disagree with him. >> it seems at odds with the buffett rule, which suggests that taxes are important. >> for government to have revenue? >> business people oftentimes say that it does not matter. then you get one level of analysis beneath that and they wake up, which is that you are given a spread sheet. if you're on a board, you are given a result. in the calculation that creates that result, there's a whole lot of things like taxes and other costs. if you run sensitivities on analyses based on different formulas you get different outcomes. it's not that it's not important, but you are looking at a broader conclusions rather than getting into the actual details. >> to encourage innovation, what would you do? >> taxes are imbedded in the analysis and people just don't recognize it. second, we have a corpor
security analyst ryan moore. ryan good to have you on the show. five that you outline and i want to make sure we get to all five. start with the israel or iranian conflict, will that heat up. >> sure. israel has to stop or delay it and iran presidential election and when there is a political crisis you pick a fight with israel. >> eric: we need to point out not the president of iran that has the power but the mullahs. >> right. >> eric: chaos in syria spread? >> it is already spreading. al-qaida operatives trying to carry out terrorist attack in jordan and face a, the dictator that is a proxy of iran and fighting militants and muslim brotherhood. >> eric: how does it theten america. >> this is a stronghold for al-qaida there. is plenty of good rebel to work with and we didn't . secular rebels don't control what is happening on the ground. >> eric: serious threat. middle eastern oil turmoil. what can happen. >> everyone focus on the conflict of iran and israel. but there is a conflict between saudi arabia and iran . the fact that iranian tried to launch a cyber attack. shows that saudi ar
an introduction, shelly moore capito. >> i knew following mario was going to be a problem. but anyway, thank you all for being here. i want to thank the families and the young children who are here. i come from a different viewpoint. i do have a grandchild and i see this through her eyes and the debt that christie talked about is very daunting for her. but i'm also in that middle generation where i'm caring for my parents. they're heavily reliant on medicare and social security and me and our family to support them. and i understand how important those safety net programs are for them. but for these children, if we don't take the opportunity that we have this week, this month, to look at those programs so that when these children are the age of my parents and their children are trying to figure out how to meet those heavy costs of their health care, we will have missed an opportunity that would be unforgivable. and so for my parents, my grandchild and for me and for all the parents and grandchildren and caregivers in this country, we must come with this commonsense plan, we can't ask people arou
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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